Marketing scholarship offers during the athletic recruiting process

I recently had a comment from a parent who sits in a very desirable situation.  Even though his son is just entering his junior year of high school, he already holds two early scholarship offers.  What that means is his son has already gotten off to a great start in the recruiting process.  But with the offers in hand, now is a great time to capitalize on them.

I have always mentioned that making your offers public is important during the recruiting process.  Some feel differently, but I strongly feel that if schools see other programs recruiting you, they are going to take a closer look at you because of that interest.  Never lie about the amount of interest that you actually have but part of marketing yourself is letting other colleges and media outlets know that the scholarship offers are on the table.

While I don’t know all that much about the situation with the offers, the hope is that on September 1st these scholarships will become offers on paper instead of just a verbal offer.  I have heard many stories about coaches offering verbal scholarships and never coming through.  But for the sake of this article, lets say that the hard copies of the offers will be coming early next month.

If there have been other schools outside of the two recruiting this athlete, make sure to let the coaches know that there are two offers on the table.  As a parent, you can send an email update to the coach who you have had the most contact with.  Tell them about how the preseason practices/early games are going for your son, their updated height/weight, and about the recruiting interest.  The more coaches that know, the better for you.

The offers may also help you open more doors to schools that an athlete has grown up dreaming to play for.   I stress to market your child or yourself to college coaches.  When you pick new schools to contact and send your recruiting profile to, make sure to include that these two have offered early scholarship offers.  Make sure to include the date as well because you really have to be an excellent recruit to get offers so early in the recruiting process.

Once those are done, the third and final step is contact media outlets.  If it was me, the first place I would go is to check Rivals.com and see if the schools that have offered have a website on their network.  If it is updated frequently and people actually seem to care about it, then email the publisher and introduce yourself with mention of the offer.  If the site is poorly run (Most of the major BCS schools have the best sites), then email the recruiting experts at Rivals in your area.  Also, make sure to check out the high school site in your state and judge if it is worth contacting them about the information.  With these prep sites, only a few are done well so think hard if it is worth it.

After you have tried Rivals.com, do the exact same steps with 247Sports.  Look for sites at the schools that have offered and then try contacting their recruiting experts .  Last but not least, try the high school site in your state as well.  After that, the third place I would contact is ESPN.  I have tried searching for their contact information but it is definitely tricky.

The last place I would contact would be your local newspaper.  Find out who the prep writer is for your area (Most should already know this) and email them about the offers.  While it does not mean they are going to drop everything and do an article, it is good to let them know for future articles.

The reason that you tell college coaches about this is that offers breed more offers.  I really believe that.  Contacting Rivals, Scout, and ESPN is the next step to get the word out about the offers.  College coaches love checking out those sites so they will likely see it and move on from there.

Again, having scholarships before your junior year is a great thing.  It says a lot about the athlete and their ability on the field and you are in a very good position at this point.

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